Study Finds Potentially Treatable Cause of Dementia Following Stroke

UA College of Medicine – Tucson researcher Kristian Doyle, PhD, is first author of the study published in the Feb. 4 edition of the Journal of Neuroscience.

The development of dementia following a stroke may be due to chronic inflammation in the brain that could be treated with a medication used for rheumatoid arthritis and some cancers, according to a study published in the Feb. 4 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

Of the 800,000 Americans each year who survive a stroke, nearly one-third develop dementia within a year. Very little is known about inflammation in the brain after stroke, or why some stroke patients develop dementia, a severe decline in mental ability such as memory or thinking skills that can interfere with daily life.

University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson researcher Kristian Doyle, PhD, is first author on the study, “B-Lymphocyte-mediated delayed cognitive impairment following stroke,” which was conducted when he was a post-doctoral scholar in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine, Calif., under the mentorship of the study’s principal investigator Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD, Stanford assistant professor of neurology and neurosurgery.

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